Museum

"A STROLL OF DISCOVERY ACROSS TIME"

The Sake Museum, which is directly adjoining from our Tasting Room, features a collection that is one of its kind in the U.S.A. Takara Sake USA Inc. has been acquiring and preserving a wide array of sake-making artifacts and tools from Japan over the years. Walk among the tools used by real Toji (brew masters) and brewery workers from the early 20th century. The museum exhibit includes an explanation of the traditional sake-making process as well as the history of sake-breweries in the United States. Immerse yourself in a world of sake, of simple beauty and extraordinary feat of engineering and innovation.

This self-guided museum is sure to satisfy both experts and the general public.

17th-19th Century Sake Making

  • The polishing process after milling rice is important for producing different types of sake.

    • 1 Tawara
    • 2 Komebitsu
    • 3 Ittomasu
    • 4 Fumioke
    • 5 Gonburi
    • 6 Kakioke
    • 7 Tsukeoke
  • After steaming for 50-60 minutes, the rice is removed from the Koshiki

    • 8 Kama
    • 9 Koshiki
    • 10 Kyudai
    • 11 Bunji
    • 12 Mushitorigutsu
    • 13 Meshidame
  • Rice is cooled and mixed with Koji. The Koji mold grows in wooden trays called Kojibuta. As the Koji mold grows, the process produces heat. In order to control the temperature of the Koji Rice, the Kojibuta are rotated from top to bottom.

    • 14 Murodai
    • 15 Kaiwari
    • 16 Kojihiroge
    • 17 Morimasu
    • 18 Kojibuta
  • Koji Rice, steamed rice and water are mixed together. Mixing of the mash (Yamaoroshi) continues until the mixture reaches a paste-like consistency. The use of a sealed hot water bucket (Dakidaru) to warm the mixture accelerates the fermentation process.

    • 19 Ninaibo
    • 20 Ninaioke
    • 21 Bokai
    • 22 Motokai
    • 23 Hangiri
    • 24 Dakidaru
    • 25 Motooke
  • Further mixing accelerates brewing. More steamed rice, Koji Rice and water are added. The final mash, with a high concentration of alcohol, is taken out for filtering.

    • 26 Hanyaku
    • 27 Kaburakai
    • 28 Kamajaku
    • 29 Terehangiri
    • 30 Shikomi oke
    • 31 Shamisen
  • Moromi is poured into long sacks made of heavy cotton cloth. THe press is called a Sakafune, meaning "sake boat."

    • 32 Kitsune
    • 33 Sakafune
  • After settling about 10 days, the sake is pasteurized at 65° - 70°C (149° - 158°F)

    • 35 Oribikioke
    • 36 Kaeru
  • The lid is sealed airtight for aging. After some time, the sake is ready to be shipped.

    • 30 Shikomioke
    • 37 Komodaru